Tag Archives: Dogs

Our new home

18 Nov

We have been in our new home three weeks now. It seems we have been here for ever! We live in a small village called Leuc (pronounced lurk).

Our new house

The house is a bungalow with three bedrooms, kitchen, lounge diner, bathroom and separate WC. We share a boundary with one neighbour but on the other three sides it is clear. We are located on a small estate of similar but not identical houses.

It’s very quiet and the neighbours are friendly. We have introduced ourselves to most of the near neighbours, by offering them a small box of eggs. They had no idea that we had three hens living down the side of our garage. Shows how quiet they are!

Armistice day

Last Thursday 11 November we attended the ceremony at the war memorial to celebrate the end of World War 1.

After the ceremony at the War Memorial, we all gathered in a large room in the Town Hall for drinks and nibbles. We introduced ourselves to the mayor and one of the deputy mayors, and we chatted to a soldier in uniform who is one our neighbours.

After talking about an Old Age Pensioners club which we belonged to in Montolieu, we were asked if we’d like to set one up here in Leuc as the last one disintegrated after the president of it died. However there aren’t as many pensioners in Leuc as in Montolieu!

Neighbourhood

All our close neighbours are very nice and have welcomed us.

Public transport

There is public transport to and from our village. A single carriage rail service runs from Carcassonne (below the Black Mountain) to Limoux (below the Pyrenees) six days a week. The line passes just the other side of the road. There is an unmanned railway crossing so the train drivers give a little hoot on the train horn as they approach. There are 13 train journeys a day, all of which stop at the halt in the next village (Couffoulens).

There is also a bus service that turns into Carcassonne but we have not explored that yet. It’s a bit difficult to know when to catch it, as there are roadworks in the centre of Leuc and the bus seems to terminate at the end of our road.

Our village

We have a small shop which is also a wine merchant and has regular wine tastings. Our boulangerie has lovely cakes as well as a choice of breads. The health centre covers quite a large number of villages and therefore we have 4 doctors, a nurse, 2 midwives, a physio, an osteopath and a chiropodist. The pharmacy next door is quite large and stocks more medications than our previous one in Montolieu. They also do the flu and Covid immunisations without appointments during the week. In front of the health centre is a large recreation are with outdoor exercise machines as well as a football pitch and a disused pétanque boulodrome. There is also a primary school here, not that we’re really interested in this facility but it is noticeable that many of the small villages of France have managed so far to maintain their local primary schools. Like the post offices which are slowly being closed down in the villages but some are being retained and serviced by the Town hall in order to keep the facility open.

Richard has already tested the osteopath and the barber and I’ll be checking out the chiropodist soon. I’m still looking for the hairdresser and beautician though.

Floods

Like a lot of villages close to water in the Aude, Leuc was badly affected by the floods of October 2018. The photographs below show the heights of the various floods over the years.

Walks

There are plenty of places to walk around us. Along the railway line, alongside the river, in fields and vineyards. The dogs can be let off their leads and often we do not meet another soul.

Posh Hotel

Just 5 kms from our house is a locally famous hotel and restaurant – the Chateau de Cavanac. Those of you that have eaten at Les Anges au Plafond in Montolieu, will know Bernard, the chef/owner, who now works at the Chateau de Cavanac following the closure of his restaurant.

Chateau de Cavanac

We have yet to eat there! Just waiting for a big celebration!

Coming to the village

The usual route to our village is from Carcassonne on the road to Saint-Hilaire. This is the view coming down past the village of Couffoulens.

You can see the Pyrenees from here

There is much, much more for us to explore. We do hope you will come and visit us next year.

Thunder in the hills

19 May

Last night I was woken by the dog, who was panting and moving around in an agitated state. Nettles always sleeps in our bedroom since we moved out here; it was a way to reassure her. About an hour later I heard the first roll of thunder. It must have been a long way away, by the sound of it. Nettles has always been our early warning system of an impending storm. I don’t know how long the thunder lasted as I dozed in and out of consciousness but I do remember some pretty long rolls. It was not the short bangs that we normally associate with a thunderstorm. It seemed to be rolling around the plain between the Black Mountains and the Pyrenees. I didn’t see any lightning either.

Eventually, I drifted off to sleep. I was woken at about 8 by the table on the other side of the bed moving, and a box of vitamin pills falling on the floor, as well as by a desperate scrabbling sound! Our dear dog, in an attempt to hide from the storm, had got behind the table and was now trying to extract herself! You see, normally she goes to hide in the shower area of the guest bedroom or under one of the beds there but the bedroom door was shut.

The second favourite place is under the kitchen work surface, behind a curtain and next to the gas bottle! Anyway, there are more thunderstorms on the way, so I’ll have to watch out for her this afternoon.

When we first moved out here, there was a pretty big storm and Nettles fled out the back door and disappeared! We were terribly worried as she was in a strange area and feared that she would get lost. It rained torrentially – the French saying is “il pleut comme une vache qui pisse”! Five hours later she reappeared, dry as a bone. No idea where she’d gone! It happened again some two months later, despite our efforts to close all external doors as soon as a storm was on its way. This time she came back two hours later but looking like a drowned rat!

Hey ho! The joys of dog ownership!