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Keeping Life in Perspective

6 Nov

Being in confinement (or lockdown as it’s known as in the UK) has made me think about life in ways I haven’t considered before.

I always try to look on the bright side of life and spread happiness where I can. Most of the time this has been achieved by my actions helping people from all walks of life. And by thinking what have I learnt from this negative experience. At the same time I know I can be critical and sometimes appear negative but I consider myself a realist and not a dreamer. By this, I mean that I consider what I would like to happen and then try to look further into the future to see if it is possible. The danger of this type of thinking is that you never try anything because you talk yourself into thinking it’s not possible. I think I overcame this way back in my life because I have tried many different things. But I often put off doing things longer than necessary.

As I grow older I’m beginning to realise that we make our decisions according to our perception of the time we have available. When we are young we think we have a lifetime ahead of us. As we get older we begin to think time is too short. That got me to thinking about people who are incarcerated for whatever reason or people who are locked inside themselves (who may be described as being autistic) or people who are disabled and unable to get about by themselves or the elderly who for their own safety have to stay away from others during the COVID pandemic and how they might feel about time. I am sure that many of us feel bored and frustrated when our freedom is restricted.

The question is how we deal with boredom. Do we allow our frustrations to boil over into anger and take out our frustrations on the people closest to us by shouting, arguing or even physical abuse or do we turn it inside and decide it’s easier not to talk to anyone but ourselves? When this happens most of our thoughts are critical and blaming and it becomes a vicious cycle. So how do you deal with boredom and frustration?

I feel grateful that I live where I do but it doesn’t stop me from being bored or frustrated at times. Hence, this blog. I realise I can walk into the garden or simply look out of the window at the river or the forest to marvel at nature or I can take the dogs for short walks. So what stops me? It’s too hot or too cold or windy outside or my joints and muscles are causing me some discomfort. I’m enjoying being in the warmth of my home. So why do I feel bored? I can read and have hundreds of books to choose from but I’ve been reading for weeks now and I’m looking for something different. I can sit and listen to music or an audiobook or talk to friends on the phone or even see them, even from miles away with all the technology available to us today. So why do I feel bored? I believe it’s the feeling of having our freedom taken away from us and our routines changed by someone else. There’s something unsettling about not being able to do what we want to do when we want to or go where we want. It’s not simple dealing with boredom and frustration, is it!?

It helps me to think about the people I mentioned earlier and how much luckier I am than them. I have a tendency to think too much and things get out of proportion. So my message to myself is to go and do something different from what I’m doing at the moment within the constraints that I have. Perhaps connecting with someone else who’s in a more difficult situation than I am will help me feel more satisfied.

Well that’s Christmas over with!

7 Jan

It’s all quietened down here after Christmas and the New Year. To be honest, it never got into gear! It’s one of the differences we noticed when moving over here – Christmas is not a big deal. Firstly, only 25th December and 1st January are public holidays (and only if they do not fall on a weekend). Secondly, as the holiday break is so short, there is not the frenzied rush to go shopping beforehand. So we quite enjoy the more relaxed atmosphere.

The ice skating rink – Place Carnot, Carcassonne

It can get quite cold over here, says Trish!


Les Gilets Jaune

The astonishing site of people protesting in yellow high visibility jackets (“les Gilets Jaunes”) has created quite a stir in France. It has certainly shocked the French government. The demonstrators have intermittently blocked roundabouts, commercial centres and motorways over the last eight weeks. They have caused chaos – and many firms are laying off people, complaining of drop in sales (up to 30% has been reported which is bad news just before Christmas, especially when many seasonal businesses get about 40% of their sales in the run-up to Christmas). They have also caused an immense amount of damage – in Carcassonne they have defaced the Prefecture and the Town Hall, vandalised nearly 30 cash dispensers and burnt part of the toll booth at Carcassonne East exit.

It has to be explained that this type of protest is perfectly normal in France – the police or gendarmes will only intervene if the protest or assembly is illegal (all protests have to be notified to the Prefecture three days in advance). In general. French people see this type of protest as perfectly acceptable; it is the right of the people to demonstrate. I know I found this hard to understand before I moved to France but now I see it is part of the culture here. And it often works.

However, the level of violence and damage is much higher than usual. And in part this is due to the average person feeling unrepresented by the authorities. The price of fuel (which has risen by 15% in the last 12 months) was the last straw. But many feel isolated, under-rewarded and forgotten. So they are making their feelings known. And it has worked in part.

Each mayor has opened up an official book in which any citizen can write what they want to see changed. It is based on six main themes, so as to give the result some cohesion. The results will be fed back to the elected people and from this the government will set out their revised programme.

Protesters in action

But now public sentiment is turning against the protestors as the mindless violence and damage continues. In Toulouse, there have been groups of female protestors, marching to say it’s not them that is causing the damage.