That dreaded B***it word

16 Feb

Well I have avoided it up to now, but now is the time for me to express my feelings about the UK leaving the EU.

I have been using a forum called Quora which is a place to gain and share knowledge. It’s a platform to ask questions and connect with people who contribute unique insights and quality answers.

Someone asked me the question “What do the older generation in England feel about Brexit?” So I thought I would reproduce below my response.

I’m 69 years old and lived in Britain until I moved to France in 2013. The referendum result was a shock to me and a lot of my contemporaries. I got the impression that people were expressing a profound dissatisfaction with a lot of things, and at the same time not really understanding the implications of their decision to leave.

I’ve been involved in trading with Europe since before the opening of the European market in 1992. I was chair of the 1992 committee in my home town, when our mission was to explain to businesses the implications of the open borders. It helped a lot of small businesses to trade into Europe (and particularly France) and it was an exciting time. No border controls for goods, no tariffs, no long queues at Dover, no barriers at all. If it had the EU mark then any product could be sold throughout the EU.


I also studied how the EU worked, as a lot of my clients needed to know this. I formed the view that it was accountable although unwieldy and that it had the interests of all the citizens at its heart. It provided dispute resolution between countries – a much better way to resolve issues than the USA’s current trade wars. And I was proud of the role the UK played in the EU. My European friends often said, ”we need the UK, to control our excesses)”!


So I’m sad that all this is changing. I’m sad for my fellow citizens in the UK as they will be going through a profound change over the next ten years. No aspect of life will be untouched, I predict. They will change what they eat, what cars they buy, where they go on holiday, how they work, etc. And if j know Brits at all, they hate change and this is too much change all at once!

Images of a chaotic process

I have also been cutting and pasting images that either amuse me or reflect my view about leaving and I’d like to share these with you as well:

Brits abroad

I think the hardest thing of all for us British people who have taken advantage of the freedom to live and work in another EU country, is the almost complete lack of empathy (or even compassion) shown by those in the UK that support leaving the EU. I won’t reproduce here the many nasty comments that I have received after I have posted a comment or a question about Britain leaving the EU.

I can probably sum up the responses as either being “You chose to leave so hard luck” or “You are no longer in Britain so you have no right to complain” to those that basically tell me that it will be alright on the night. So just in case you are amongst the latter, who think it will be OK no matter what version of Brexit is put in place, let me tell you that having one’s life turned upside down is very difficult indeed. For the moment, I suspect most of you in the UK will not have noticed much change personally (apart from all the media publicity and ferocious arguments).

Those of us living in Europe have had to completely change our plans. Some have already returned home – there are many British people leaving our area, selling up and coming home because they are fearful that they won’t be able to afford the healthcare in France. That’s going to be a terrible problem for the NHS since you are now having a lot of relatively health migrants leaving the UK, to be replaced by a bunch of mainly older and sicker people!

Those of us who cannot return home (similar to us in that they have sold up and moved everything to France where the cost of living is lower and therefore much harder to return to the relatively high cost of the UK), and have decided to tough it out.

We are applying for permanent residency in France (called a “Carte de Séjour”). This involves quite a lot of work, assembling all the evidence required to prove we have lived over here for at least five years and that we have the means to support ourselves and not be a drain on the French social security system. Since we had no idea that we would have to apply for this when we moved here at the beginning of 2013, we had not kept much paperwork. So you can imaging the pain of having to get hold of utility bills and bank statements going back nearly six years.

Next, we will be applying for French citizenship. This is a more convoluted process which will entail several interviews and answering questions about our understanding of France and how life works here. Fortunately I have had a good grounding in this provided by my French teacher with whom I have had weekly lessons via Skype. I also can communicate quite well in French (for a foreigner) and, because I am over 60 years old, I am exempt from proving my competence by examination. But others are less fortunate.

All in all, it is an extremely worrying and stressful time for British people living in Europe. Just so you know!!!

One Response to “That dreaded B***it word”

  1. Harry Powell 17 February 2019 at 01:30 #

    Well, it is troubling, and I think for Britain it is more troubling than Trump is in the US.

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